Search found 4 matches

by Teacher in CA
Wed Aug 11, 2010 7:43 pm
Forum: Dealing with real world situations
Topic: Entering lump-sum inheritance lowers probability of success
Replies: 3
Views: 7601

Re: Entering lump-sum inheritance lowers probability of succ

One more thing... I think when I enter the inheritance, the program pays out more money in the middle years, drawing down my portfolio. It wants me to travel and remodel my kitchen after retirement! Interestingly, when I set the financial policy to “stable” instead of flexible, the program gives me ...
by Teacher in CA
Wed Aug 11, 2010 7:33 pm
Forum: Dealing with real world situations
Topic: Entering lump-sum inheritance lowers probability of success
Replies: 3
Views: 7601

Entering lump-sum inheritance lowers probability of success

Hi, I expect a modest inheritance that will boost my portfolio shortly after I retire. But when I enter, say, $100,000 as a one-time savings a couple years after retirement, my whole plan is less successful, and the ending portfolio value is less. Why is this? And is this the best way to enter a one...
by Teacher in CA
Wed Aug 11, 2010 7:27 pm
Forum: Dealing with real world situations
Topic: Question about how to enter California teachers' pension
Replies: 3
Views: 6850

Re: Question about how to enter California teachers' pension

Jim, I entered my pension with the changes you suggested, and the outcome is VERY favorable...100% with green light. Of course, there is no guarantee the legislature won’t yank the 85% floor for current and future retirees, especially with the current anti-pension climate. I always figured if that h...
by Teacher in CA
Wed Aug 11, 2010 7:12 pm
Forum: Dealing with real world situations
Topic: Question about how to enter California teachers' pension
Replies: 3
Views: 6850

Question about how to enter California teachers' pension

Hello, I have been trying to figure out how to enter my future pension in the Additions section. It is a California State Teachers pension, and it doesn’t have a standard COLA, but a 2% simple (non-compounded) incremental raise every year, based on the initial benefit amount. 2% of the first year am...